Visual Archaeology Interpretation

   
 
 
   
         
 

 


Sadako Sasaki

I will write peace on your wings and you will fly all over the world
Sadako Sasaki

Grade Level K-12
Language Arts • Social Studies • Science

War has lasting effects. Long after the aggression has ceased negative effects remain. Japan is just one of numerous countries that continue to be plagued by the effects of the atomic bombs that were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The story of Sadako Sasaki provides a starting point for this discussion on the need for peace. Sadako was a baby of two on August 6, 1945, unaware of the war that raged around her. On that day she lost more than her grandmother as an atomic bomb reduced the city of Hiroshima to a desert of destruction and radioactive wasteland. She survived the initial blast with seemingly no ill effects. Ten years passed and Sadako grew strong and swift. It was as she was practicing for a competition that she crumpled to the track and was taken to the hospital. There her worst fears were confirmed. She had developed leukemia as a result of her exposure to radiation. During her long hospital stays, Sadako began to fold paper cranes. According to Japanese legend, if an individual folds 1000 paper cranes, a wish will be granted. With each crane she folded, the wish was the same-to get well. October of 1955, Sasako folded her last crane-number 644,and she quietly became another of the many casualties of a war that had ended ten years earlier. Her classmates finished the remaining 366 cranes to honor Sadako's memory and to share in her wish that such bombs of destruction would never be used again. The children told Sadako's story to the world by sharing the letters they had exchanged during her hospital stay. In 1958, a monument was erected in Hiroshima's Peace Park to honor Sadako and all of the children who died because of the bombs. This monument has become an international symbol of peace. Every year thousands of children visit the memorial bringing chains of folded cranes to lay at the base. Each crane is a prayer for peace-prayers and wishes that number in the millions.

Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes

Children's Peace Monument

Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes

 

Cranes for Peace

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 
 

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Copyright ©2004 Linda Kreft